Young Adult Drug Addiction

Help My Child

Young Adult Drug Addiction

From the first moment you welcomed your child into this world, the deepest sense of security are overwhelmingly obvious as the responsibility of protecting them from harm and danger is your highest priority. As they get older you continue to nourish, love, guide, and express the importance of their place on earth. To them you are their biggest fans in life, and to you they will always be your baby.

However, what happens when your child is involved in one of the most harmful behaviors possible? How do you do for them, what they can not for themselves? How do you handle watching their lives slip further and further into darkness and nothing you do ever remedies the issue? Do you know the dangers of addiction?

Do you provide or give your child money whenever they ask for it, even when you know exactly what they will do with it? Is your child becoming manipulative or creative with reasons why they need help? While you may feel compelled to help, by buffering the addict from the consequences of the addiction, they allow the addiction to move forward damaging your child’s life more in the long run.

Enabling can easily be misconstrued, especially if it is your child you are trying help by giving them money, or paying bills on their behalf. These tasks are generally ignored due to binges that alter ones lifestyle. Simple responsibilities like waking up in the morning on time, daily functions to survive and support ones self are all put on the back burner until they get their fix. Paying for rent or other bills don’t have top priority when all they are thinking about is using again.

Young Adult Drug Addiction

By allowing them to take on everyday responsibilities on their own, and going through the pain and failure can sometimes help your child possibly have an epiphany about drug use and the dangers of leaving an addiction untreated. How does enabling make you feel? Do you feel more stress and depression yourself because you are so worried about your child? This is common and once that happens you start to find ways to justify the addiction subconsciously. Statements like, “His problem isn’t as bad as you think it is.”, or “I know my child, and if I really ask her to quit she would.” What can you do to change this type of behavior?

Begin the healing process by simply having someone to talk to outside of the family unit. Getting another perspective on the situation, outside looking in, is a great place to start. It will give parents and the addict some power over the situation by talking about the problem in clear terms. Some benefit by joining a support group. The good thing about support groups is that most if not all are in similar situations, and its easier to understand and relate with one another about issues your facing with your child’s addiction. An intervention and admission into a treatment center will ultimately be the best option for your child, the sooner the better if that option is available.

New Roads can help your child get their life back. We have tailored our program to fit the needs of young adults 18-28, so your child will get the focus and attention needed from day one. We have found that being around others who are around the same age, similar interests, and have the same problems- recovery is more effective when they can relate rather than walking alone on the road to recovery. Our holistic approach to treatment presents the opportunity to see what will work best for your child, and although we do offer the 12 step program, our treatment is not based off of it. Finding what works for each individual is our mission. Together through treatment, support, and recovery your child can start their journey toward finding their light in this world.

Listed below are drugs most commonly abused by young adults, and we have provided information like, signs of using, what to look for, withdrawal symptoms, and how to get your child into treatment. We hope the information provided empowers you towards the right direction in taking the next step to recovery.

youngadultdrugtreatment

prescriptiondruglink

alcoholabuselink

opiateabuselink

xanaxabuselink

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